Tag Archives: kinky hair tips

Get Pillow Soft Curls on Kinky Hair (and other types)

Ever wonder the secret to gorgeous curls? Are you tired of the plain old twistout or braidout? Does the curl fall out of your bantu knots as soon as you take them down? The other day a lady complimented me on my hair. She was like, “Wow, it looks so soft and shiny…Can I touch it?” Proudly, I said, “Sure!” Normally, I might hesitate  but I was feeling my curls. Here’s my technique using bantu knots to achieve an optimum curl.

1. Start with stretched or blown out hair. If you are strictly a no heat person, then working with an old twistout or banding technique will do fine. Stretching will give you more length and flexibility and dry faster.




2. Go one section at a time. Section hair into medium to large chunks, about 1-2 inches wide.

3. Smooth out kinks with oil and a wide-tooth comb. I used Eden Body Works Jojoba and Monoi Oil and coconut oil to smooth out my hair. Using the oil will prevent hair from becoming too hard or flaking. A dab of oil on each section will do.

4. Do not use gel. Use a good curly pudding. For this I used Miss Jessie’s Curly Pudding. A dab or two will do. You don’t want too much because the product mixed with oil will be too gloppy.

5. MY SECRET: Two-strand twist the hair before bantu knotting…why? Makes kinky hair more curly, and lasts longer. Kinky hair is thick, so the more sections you make, the more curl you can add.

6. Allow bantu knots to set over night. Before taking down your hair, squeeze the knot to make sure the hair is completely dry. It is still feels damp, or if too much oil is coming out, your hair will be frizzy and have little curl. If you have time, wait another day…seriously. Or, sit under a hooded dry on a low setting to speed up drying time.

Day 1 Bed Time 

You should still have enough curl left in your hair to not have to do much to it. All I did for day one is make sure my curls where laying uniform and gently crunched them under my satin hair bonnet.

Day 2 Bed Time (and beyond)
By the end of day 2, my hair was pretty frizzy. So, I decided to retwist and re-bantu only using a moisturizing cream. I focused primarily on smoothing product on my ends, then smoothed down from root to end. At Day 3 you might consider spritzing with water to rehydrate your hair. You can repeat the day 1 routine with the curly pudding which I find gives more sheen than just using the moisturizing cream. However, if this is my day to day style, then I like using just the cream for less build up. I would not do this past a week due to product build up and the potential for overstyling abuse.

Hope you enjoyed this style. Let us know if you have tried or plan to try this style.

Great Low Maintenance Style: Pompadour/Bang Bun Updo

I often talk about this blog about how I have no time to fuss with my hair. I tend to stick with low manipulation styles that last a long time. This week, I’m wearing my hair in a pompadour and bun updo style. It is cute, extremely easy to do and maintain. These pics are from a friend’s birthday party I went to over the weekend. Here are a few tips on how I achieved this style.


1. I work with hair that has already been stretched either from a blowout, twistout or other method.

2. Next, I take about a third of my hair in the front to make a bang. Then secure it out of the way with a hair clip or scrunchy.

3. My hair was a little dry so I moisturized it by lightly spritzing with a detangling spray. Then I smoothed in some hair milk. Be sure to separate the hair so that you get good coverage throughout that section. Use sparingly. Making the hair too wet will cause more shrinkage. (You will get some shrinkage by moisturizing, but it’s worth it for the sake of your hair.). Lastly, I sealed in moisture with coconut oil (use oil of choice).

4. Use the oil to smooth out the hair with your hands from root to end. Gather the hair into a ponytail or puff atop your head. Secure with a hair tie or ouchless headband. I prefer to use a headband and double-loop it for a tighter hold that doesn’t hurt. I find it to be the best solution for gathering a whole bunch a kinky or thick hair.

5. Make a bun by separating the puff into two sides. Start with one side, and roll the hair down and around and secure with hair pins. Be sure to cover the headhand with your hair. I don’t worry about making a perfect bun…remember I have no time to fuss with my hair.

6. Repeat steps 3 and 4 on the front section. Finger-roll the bang/pompadour by clamping the end of your hair with your index and middle finger. Use your other index finger to roll the hair under. Secure with hair pins. I used to use this technique back in the day as a little girl to make bangs.

7. For an added touch, I tied a pretty scarf around my head and made a bow on top.

Hope you enjoy this style as much as I do. Let know if you have done it or plan to do it in the comment section or on our Facebook page.

Quick Hair “Recovery” Style: Puffy Twists Pinned Back

Boy, oh boy, am I a busy woman! I was rocking an afro puff for an entire week!. I love my puff but it was time for it to go. However, I still don’t have time right now to wash and detangle my hair and all that rigmarole…I know this weekend I want to do a twistout. So, in preparation, I decided to restore life to my hair by doing puffy twists pinned back. Here’s a few tips on how I restored moisture and set the style.

1. First off, my hair was pretty dried out, so the first step was to preform surgery and add in moisture. Starting in the back, I parted a small section of hair for a medium-size twist. I got out my spray bottle with water and spray each section as I went along. Then, I smoothed out each section with peppermint oil and Shea Moisture Smoothie and proceeded to twist.

2. The twists turned out poofy because the addition of water swells the hair. I always say, just go with flow with natural hair and let it do what it wants to do. I also did not want to make the parts very neat because doing so in my hair’s fragile state would mean more detanlging time and possible breakage. So, I very gently finger-parted the hair.

Before: Hanging out at the Sox game
with the fam and “the puff”

3. I achieved the look you see by basically flat-twisting to the back each row of twist and pinning the hair down with a bobby pin. I did the same in the back by twisting upward. Once the hair was all gathered at the top, I simply twisted the hair down and pinned and tucked it underneath the other twists.

This is just a quick style you can do if you don’t what take down your twists right away, or are preparing for a wash. It also works nice if you have twists that aren’t very long. You can have even more fun with this style by making the parts neater and playing around with defining the puffs.

What do you think? You may comment in the section below or under the image on Facebook or Instagram @LoveYourNaps.

Taking Down Mini-Twists Without Damaging Your Hair

mini-twist roller set (view tutorial)

As many of you know, I love doing dry mini-twists (view tutorial). There is sooo much versatily in them. It almost gives you the feeling having loose straight hair (not that straight is better…lol). But all good things must come to an end. A good rule of thumb is to take down mini-twists after 3 weeks before the hair starts to loc. (I’m guilty of leaving mine in longer…) For me, taking them done is a process.  Here’s the thing, if it took me almost 8 hours to do them, it will take about half as long to take them down. There is no way I would have to time to do that all in one sitting. So, I wear my hair twisted and untwisted over the course of several days until all the hair is untwisted. I even untwist while sitting at my desk at work. Crazy? Maybe. Realistic? Yes! Here’s my process and pics.


The Takedown Technique

hair partially untwisted-love this…

First off, I get my jar of stiff herbal oil (not grease) and coat the twist from root to end. It is important that your fingers and hair are coated with oil to prevent breakage. You can use a liquid herbal oil, but I just find it more cumbersome. I would not, however, use a smoothie or butter creme for taking down mini-twists. I find that the wetness of these products gives me more tangles. If you want to nourish your strands as you take your hair down, mix oil and a little shea butter.

back view-I know there are
some twists that I missed. lol

Let Your Fingers Do the Work

Full Mini-twistout

I begin untwisting at the nape of the neck and work my way up along the edges and temple. I leave the front for last.  I start in the middle of the twist and poke my index finger in between the two strands and slide it down pulling the twist apart. Then I repeat that step at the top of the twist and slide the rest of the twist apart. Sometimes the twist does not pull apart easily. The hair that was shed during the course of time gets tangled into the hair forming a knot. Here’s the part where patience is a virtue. To save your hair, dab some more oil on the tangle and carefully remove each strand from the knot. Sometime rolling and unraveling the knot in between your index finger and thumb will loosen up the hair, making it easier to pull apart the strands. I do not use a comb.

After Care
If your hair and scalp is not too dirty, flaky or itchy, you can get away with wearing a mini-twistout for a few days. The crinkles that are formed are really pretty. I would recommend applying a light coating of your favorite hair lotion, milk, smoothie or creme to add moisture to the hair. Believe me, you hair is thirsty after being twisted for so long, especially if you did wash or apply water during that period. After removing mini-twists, really baby your hair and be kind to it. Follow up with an intense moisturizing shampoo and deep conditioning. If you like this post, you will also like our Facebook and Twitter Posts